Page 73 - magazine-jan-feb14

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LINK BETWEEN LOW BLOOD PRESSURE AND YOUTHFUL
APPEARANCE IN WOMEN DISCOVERED
GROWING, JULPHAR
LAUNCHES NEW BRAND
INTERNATIONAL CRICKET
STARS
JOIN FORCES FOR
OPENING OF SPORTS
MEDICINE & PHYSIOTHERAPY
UNIT IN DUBAI
50% OF DIABETES CASES
REMAIN UNDIAGNOSED,
WITH UAE YOUTHS
GETTING AFFECTED 20
YEARS EARLIER THAN
THE GLOBAL AVERAGE
Julphar (Gulf Pharmaceutical Industries),
the leading UAE pharmaceutical company
in the MENA region, today launched its new
corporate brand, following the completion
of a branding project that sought to assess
its identity and image and recommend
necessary changes as the company continues
to grow and assume a bigger role in the global
healthcare industry.
A new study on ageing and
appearance led by scientists
from Unilever and Leiden
University Medical Center in
the Netherlands has discovered
that women who look younger
than their years tend to have
lower blood pressure. This
means they have a lower risk of
succumbing to cardiovascular
disease (CVD), such as heart
disease and stroke.
The extensive study set out
to determine the strength of
the relationship between how
old somebody looked - their
perceived age - and CVD. To
do this, women were placed
into groups according to their
CVD risk. Those in the group
with the lowest risk were found
to look over two years younger
than those in other groups
based on photographs of their
faces.
Commenting on the link
between female facial
appearance and CVD risk Dr
David Gunn, Unilever Senior
Scientist said: “We identified
that blood pressure was driving
the link between cardiovascular
disease risk and perceived age.
It is the first time a link between
low blood pressure and youthful
looks has been proven. This
Research discovers new links between youthful appearance, health and longevity
Consistency of brand image amidst global
growth is main driver of the new brand
Pakistan and South African national team players
attend inauguration of new medical unit at Burjeel
Hospital for Advanced Surgery
Free screenings were conducted at
Al Zahra Private Hospital Dubai to
spread life-saving awareness, with
34 million affected regionally
finding gives rise to new ways
to communicate the significant
additional benefits of a healthy
lifestyle.
“Not only this, but we also
found that the feature in the face
that blood pressure was linked
to was not skin wrinkles but
likely what we term as the ‘sag’
in the face. The exciting thing is
further investigations will enable
exact pin-pointing of the feature
in the face that signposts an
individual’s blood pressure.”
In a separate finding from the
same study, men selected from
long-lived families looked
younger when compared to a
control group of the same age,
and women and men from
long-lived families had less skin
wrinkling on the upper arm
compared to a control group of
the same age.
This is the first time that
youthful appearance has been
directly linked to familial
longevity and suggests that our
lifespan is linked to the rate at
which our skin ages.
Dr Gunn added: “Our initial
findings suggest that families
who age healthily are also
endowed with slower skin
ageing and, for males, a more
youthful face. The next stage is
to understand what is happening
inside the skin of these youthful
individuals to find out more
about their ageing secrets.”
Dr Diana Van-Heemst from
Leiden University Medical
Center said: “It is hoped
the results of the study will
encourage people to adopt a
healthy lifestyle and to regularly
monitor important health
parameters such as blood
pressure as the study shows that
these factors not only impact
health, but can also affect
physical appearance.”
The Leiden Longevity study
involves siblings of an
exceptionally old age (over 89
years), their offspring and the
partners of their offspring as
age-matched controls. Over six
hundred and fifty offspring and
partners took part and scientists
analyzed the skin wrinkling
severity on the participants’
arms and their perceived ages
using a validated methodology
involving facial photographs.
The results will be used to better
understand how appearance
can be used to study ageing in
human populations, which will
ultimately lead to personal care
and nutritional products and
services of the future.
With the UAE being among the
world’s Top 10 countries most
affected by diabetes, medical
experts have warned that a
change of mindset is required
as diabetes is now very much
a disease of the young, and
not just “senior citizens”. UAE
patients are being diagnosed
with diabetes up to 20 years
earlier than their counterparts in
other countries, and 34 million
people have been affected
across the region. Doctors
raised the alarm after patients
were diagnosed with diabetes
at an ever-decreasing age. It is
no longer unusual in the UAE
to find children with the type
of diabetes which is otherwise
more commonly seen in adults.
Unfortunately they begin their
lives at much younger age,
already burdened by the disease.
Underlining the dangerous
lack of health awareness, the
overwhelming majority of
the UAE population remains
unaware of their blood pressure,
blood sugar levels or Body
Mass Index (BMI). To remedy
this situation, Al Zahra Private
Hospital Dubai has embarked
on an intensive life-saving
awareness drive to mark World
Diabetes Day, November at Al
Zahra Auditorium. Free blood
sugar levels and risk screenings
were provided for three
consecutive days for the public,
as well as, general checkup
including blood pressure and
BMI assessment. Visitors
received important tips on how
to minimize their risk of diabetes
in addition to extensive diet and
lifestyle advice.
Jan/Feb 2014
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