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with your child to a quieter space.
2.
Be Open.
If you come to
the table with preconceived notions
and judgments, believe me, your child
will pick up on them instinctively and
communication will instantly deteriorate.
Come into the conversation with an open
mind so you can actually hear and be in
tune with what it is your child is trying to
tell you. This doesn’t mean that you have
to agree or give-in, it just means you have
given free space for communication.
3.
Validate.
Everyone wants
to know that their feelings, ideas and
opinions are important and valued. So,
while your child is talking to you or
expressing themselves, take a moment to
repeat what they have said and ask them,
Did I get that right? Then, describe some
of the underlying feelings they may have
based on what they’ve expressed. If you’re
dealing with a crying baby or toddler, the
same thing applies. Let them know that
you understand why they’re upset, you like