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What is trans fat?
Trans fat is made by adding hydrogen
to vegetable oil through a process called
hydrogenation, which makes the oil less
likely to spoil. Using trans fats in the
manufacturing of foods helps foods stay
fresh longer, have a longer shelf life and have
a less greasy feel.
Scientists aren’t sure exactly why, but the
addition of hydrogen to oil increases your
cholesterol more than do other types of
fats. It’s thought that adding hydrogen to
oil makes the oil more difficult to digest,
and your body recognizes trans fats as
saturated fats.
Trans fat in your food
Commercial baked goods - such as
crackers, cookies and cakes - and many
fried foods, such as doughnuts and
french fries - may contain trans fats.
Shortenings and some margarines can be
high in trans fat.
Trans fat
is double
trouble for
your
heart
health
When it comes to fat, trans fat is considered
by some doctors to be the worst type of fat.
Unlike other fats, trans fat — also called trans-
fatty acids — both raises your “bad” (LDL)
cholesterol and lowers your “good” (HDL)
cholesterol.
A high LDL cholesterol level in combination
with a low HDL cholesterol level increases
your risk of heart disease, the leading killer
of men and women. Here’s some information
about trans fat and how to avoid it.
TRANS FAT RAISES YOUR “BAD” (LDL) CHOLESTEROL AND LOWERS YOUR “GOOD” (HDL)
CHOLESTEROL. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT TRANS FAT AND HOW TO AVOID IT.
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Oct/Nov 2013